Investing In Good Health

 

In life as at work you need to devote time to the things that matter. How you prioritize your day will determine how productive your work day has been and how much you got done, which will eventually reflect on your overall performance.

Same is the case with health. It’s about what to prioritize, what you eat, how active you are and what your fitness goals are. These will determine your performance which will reflect on your health.

With the current lifestyle and abundance of processed food and quick fixes, it’s easy to lose sight of what’s healthy and what’s not. It is necessary that you pick the right foods, figure out the right exercises and keep yourself active so that you remain in good health.

Healthy doesn’t always mean a fit and toned body, although that wouldn’t be a bad thing. There are any number of healthy habits you can incorporate to ensure good health. An important aspect of being healthy is also not falling sick often.

Here’s where products like Fitobalt come in. This is an anti-parasitic tea infusion that is aimed at reducing the parasites in the body, thus keeping you in good health.

Products like these are made from natural products and so are generally free from any harmful side effects. These are herbal and the only care you need to take is to read the ingredients list to check if you have allergy to any of the core ingredients of the tea mix.

Parasites are said to be a common cause of frequent bouts of illness. Parasites can reside in your body and gradually decline your overall immunity. So, anti parasitic oral supplements are one way of flushing these parasites out of the body.

While you take this mixture, it will be more effective if it is teamed up with a fitness activity so that the muscles retain their strength. Also, an active lifestyle will boost your overall stamina which in turn will provide the necessary boost to fight small illnesses like cold, cough, body aches, etc.

How to go about prioritizing health?

i – Plan your day around it.

There’s no waffling on this. You want good health, it needs to be top of your priority list. This means, you move around your schedule to accommodate time and energy, be it with daily exercise, or careful meal planning or ideally both. Make sure no matter what you may or may not have time for, you dedicate a set number of minutes/hours to maintaining fitness and health.

ii – The right supplements

Often, we underestimate the importance of balancing the nutrients we take. If we are lacking anything in our diet, then we should consult a doctor and take the right supplements. This will aid in building immunity and promote good health.

iii – Flush out toxins

Eat right, stay active and make sure your body is cleansed off all the junk it’s been fed. Herbal teas, detox water and in general lots of water intake on a daily basis (8 to 10 glasses minimum) are good habits to incorporate into your everyday life.

Old fashioned typewriter

This is the page where our research project began. On Wednesday 11 October 2000, John M. “Jack” Selway, then a member of Rotary Club of Pueblo, CO #43, received a list of the first 50 Rotary clubs. This list was faxed to Selway by RI staff member, Joaqu�n Mej�a. It was the only list which could be found and was from an old fashioned typewriter. (seen on the left) Within a few days Selway had created a page for each club telling where they were located, when they met, maybe something about their communities. Then Founder Selway had the thought that perhaps their histories might be of some interest… From then on, volunteer Rotarians around the world worked on hundreds of projects:

Stories about all the presidents, first clubs of every country, early clubs of every continent, the philosophy of Rotary, the story of women in Rotary and the list goes on.

Within a few weeks of our founding the project became “Rotary First Fifty” with the authorized domain of www.rotaryfirstfifty.org still used to reach this page.

But here you can learn about the first nine years. From 1905 until 1914 — 100 Rotary clubs joined together to form this marvelous organization. By studying these clubs, you’ll find common goals, lasting values, traditions, abilities to adapt and great Rotarians.

Today the technological development is so advanced that people have the computer and various software and techniques to document everything properly. Putting such details on a webpage is the reason people all around the world know everything there is to know about Rotary. If every president of every club were to recall these details in all their important speech (as that will be the only way such details could have reached people otherwise), the audience would have eventually tuned out and lost all interest in the speech, as they would have heard this a number of times. The presidents would have been forced to repeat it for the sake of new members and the old members who have been there for years would have been the crowd that lost interest in the speech.

Now with a website carrying all the information available, one can refer to it from any part if the world. When everything goes online, it makes the world a much smaller place and easier to access. Such is the case with the stock market too.

When traders were selling stocks physically, one had to be there in person and scream on top of his lungs and buy the stocks he felt were right to invest in. then when trading went online, the entire trading scenario became more civilized and easier. It attracted more people with money, who were initially hesitant about going to such crowded places.

Now it has developed further and softwares like Fintech Ltd, remove the need for a human trader completely. This software is fully automated and makes investments on your behalf, the way you want it to. This makes it easy for everyone to invest in the stock market.

What is remarkable is that these 100 clubs are “the” original “First 100 Clubs” of Rotary. Not one of them failed. They are in five countries. They’ve weathered two world wars. Some had war in their streets and there were awful financial times. They are still here. Enjoy meeting them as we continue to discover them ourselves.

One of the objectives Rotary Global History Fellowship was to cover the history of Rotary’s early years. We chose the “First 100 Clubs” and were authorized to use www.rotaryfirst100.org, as a number during the centennial of Rotary International. For reasons satisfied by the Four Way Test, we added five clubs, all of which could have been number one-hundred. We also added eight clubs mentioned in the “1905-1948” appendix found in the first edition of “My Road to Rotary” by Paul P. Harris and published by A. Kroch and Son. The result is a study of one-hundred and thirteen clubs which cover the entire Rotary life of Rotary’s founder Paul Harris.

Rotary historians, around the world, continue to maintain and improve this archive of Rotary’s history.

1866 – The Young Women’s Christian Assoc

1866 – The Young Women’s Christian Assoc. (YWCA) founded in Boston, MAPlease, also refer to a list of “Other Women’s Milestones” from 1866 to 1920
 1868  19 April, Paul Percy Harris is born in Racine, Wisconsin to George H. and Cornelia E. Harris.

 

 1910  Paul becomes a founding member of the Prairie Club of Chicago. On one of the club’s early hikes a beautiful young woman from Edinburgh, Scotland points out a tear in his jacket and offers to fix it. Jean Thomson and Paul Harris were married several months later. The marriage lasts for 37 years until Paul’s death in 1947.
1910  First Rotary convention was held in Chicago, 15-17 August, with sixteen clubs in Rotary. The National Association of Rotary Clubs was formed. Paul Harris was elected president of the Association and served two terms. Chesley R. Perry began 32 years of service as Secretary, then General Secretary of Rotary from 1910-1942.

 

At the RI Convention in Chicago, some delegates made the first attempt at official sanction of ‘Women’s Auxiliaries. It was rejected overwhelmingly.

1912

 

<style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>July 1912 – Belfast Rotarians vote to refuse membership to women</style=”font-size:>

6-9 August – 50 Clubs meet in <style=”font-size: 9pt”=”” color=”#0000FF”> Duluth </style=”font-size:>with delegates from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada and the organization becomes “The International Association of Rotary Clubs.” London joins the same year as the 50th club. 5,000 members. Paul Harris is named President emeritus.

At the RI Convention in Duluth, the second attempt at official sanction of ‘Women’s Auxiliaries received a cold shoulder by the 598 delegates.

Also in 1912, Paul bought Jean a large home and they named their home after a road in Edinburgh, “Comely Bank.” There they started their life long friendship garden.

1914 22-26 June and 1,288 Rotarians make the long journey to Houston, TX, USA.  Rotarian Henry Brunier of San Francisco and his wife “Ann” boarded a special train for the convention. Since Ann was the only woman on the train for most of the trip, the other Rotarians began calling her “Rotary Ann”. In Houston the Bruniers met Guy and Ann Gundaker of Philadelphia. Soon the name “Rotary Ann”  belonged to Guy’s wife as well. The term “Rotary Ann” lasted until the late 1980’s. Gundaker was RIP 1923-24.
1919 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> Paul Harris’ mother, Cornelia Bryan Harris dies in Denver, Colorado. Paul had spent very little time with his parents who never seemed to be able to keep their family together. It was Paul’s grandfather whose quiet generosity maintained his parents. Paul’s father, George, never very successful in life, is vigilant as his wife’s caretaker at the end of her life.</style=”font-size:>

Club #500 Fremont, Nebr., U.S.A.

1921 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>24 May 1921 – Mrs. Alwilda F. Harvey, wife of the then Chicago Rotary Club president, stepped into a leadership that brought fifty-nine Rotary wives together at a luncheon in the Sherman House. Then and there Alwilda became founder and president of a new organization, first called the Women of Rotary. She made a good speech, and some of it got into the records. (Neither the men or women of Chicago favoured the RotaryAnn nomenclature.) Mrs Alwilda F Harvey, wife of Club #1’s President went on to say: “Women through the ages have always practiced ‘Service Above Self’ now we have the opportunity to put the slogan into practice in serving our community”. The new movement was chartered in Illinois state as a non-profit corporation on May 22nd 1923. </style=”font-size:>

 

13 June 1921 – At the International Convention in Edinburgh, Rotary releases a supplement to the 1920 Proceedings written for all members, called the ‘Manual of Procedure.’ It included prohibitions on women as members of Rotary, or women�s clubs that used the Rotary name. It permitted a �Ladies� Auxiliary� for a Rotary club, however.

1923 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>15 November 1923 </style=”font-size:>– Manchester, England, produced an invitation for Rotary wives to discuss, “Proposed Formation of a Ladies Rotary Club in Manchester” The idea of a women’s Rotary Club was dropped immediately, but, under the leadership of Mrs. Oliver Golding, the wives adopted the title of Inner Wheel.
1928 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>Paul Harris’ 1928 autobiography “The Founder of Rotary” is published.November 1928 – Oklahoma City, Club 29 is responsible for the origin of the Rotary Ann auxiliary organization, after it was proposed by OKC Rotarian Virgil Browne’s wife, Maimee Lee.

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1935 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>Paul and Jean Harris travel to Hawaii, Japan, China, the Philippines, Australia, New Zealand and Canada attending conferences, planting “Friendship Trees,” and Paul writes a statement of international philosophy from Parramatta, Australia.Paul Harris writes “This Rotarian Age” and includes his comments on women in business and women and Rotary.

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1935 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>Paul Harris writes his second autobiography, “This Rotarian Age,” this time mostly about the evolution of Rotary in the first 30 years of the organization. </style=”font-size:>
1946 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>Jean Harris becomes the first Honorary Member of the Inner Wheel Club of Edinburgh.</style=”font-size:>
1947 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> 27 January – After a many years of ill health, Rotary founder Paul Harris dies (see obituary)  Following his death Jean experiences a break down.</style=”font-size:>
1947 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> </style=”font-size:>

Paul’s widow, Jean Thomson Harris, alone and childless, sold “Comely Bank” and lived in a Chicago hotel. Until 1955, she was involved in charity and philanthropy.

 

 

 

1949 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>The Rotary Foundation admits women as Ambassadorial Scholarships recipients.</style=”font-size:>
1950 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>18-22 June 1950 – The Rotary Club of Ahmedabad, India, proposes Enactment 50-10 to the International Convention in Detroit. It would delete the word MALE from Article III of the Standard Club Constitution. It was overwhelmingly rejected.</style=”font-size:>
1955 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> Rotary’s Golden Jubilee features a last appearance by Rotary’s “First Lady.” Following the 50th anniversary convention (1955), held in Chicago, Jean Thomson Harris returned to Edinburgh.</style=”font-size:>
1962 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>First Interact club was formed by Melbourne, Florida U.S.A. Rotary Club. In August of 1962, Jean Harris attends a small reception for the 50th anniversary of RC of Edinburgh. RI president elect Carl P. Miller was in attendance. RC of Edinburgh kept in close touch with Mrs. Harris until her death. The club maintains signs and remembrances to this day.</style=”font-size:>
1963 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>9 November 1963 – Jean Thomson Harris dies in a Nursing Home in Newington, Edinburgh, the day after her 82nd birthday.</style=”font-size:>

(See www.rotaryfirst100.org/women/jeanharris )

1964 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>June 1964 – The agenda of the Council meeting at the RI Convention in Toronto contains an enactment for the admission of women to Rotary clubs. Convention delegates vote that it be withdrawn.</style=”font-size:>
1972 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>January 1972 – The Rotary Club of Upper Manhattan, New York, USA, proposes an enactment, 72-48, to admit women to Rotary clubs to the Council on Legislation. After laughter and discussion, 72-48 is rejected.</style=”font-size:>
1977 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>January 1977 – Four enactments are proposed to the Council on Legislation that would essentially permit women members of Rotary, 77-16, 77-75, 77-70 and 77-94. Also proposed by Upper Manhattan, 77-16, which prohibited membership restrictions based on sex, was rejected. The other three were subsequently withdrawn. The Rotary Club of Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil, in 77-35, proposed to allow women to become honorary members. It also was rejected.</style=”font-size:>
1977 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> 1 June 1977 – Duarte held its 25th Anniversary Celebration and introduced the three women, Mary Lou Elliott, Donna Bogart and Rosemary Freitag, as members.</style=”font-size:>
1978 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>February 1978 – Rotary International first revokes the charter of the Duarte club. The club requests a hearing. The Board then tells Duarte that it must remove women members.</style=”font-size:>

27 March 1978 – Rotary International Board of Directors officially revokes the Charter of the Duarte club. Duarte decides to continue to meet as a quasi-Rotary Club. An X was placed over the Rotary insignia, new pins were made, and the club was called: The Ex-Rotary Club of Duarte.

June 1978 – The Rotary Club of Duarte, California, files suit in Los Angeles Superior Court.

1983 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>1983 – The Duarte case finally goes to trial in. California State Judge Max Deutz refuses to reinstate the club. The Duarte club immediately appeals the decision.</style=”font-size:>
1984 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>1984, </style=”font-size:>Carl E. Swenson, Governor of District 5030, appoints Lloyd Hara as Governor�s Special Representative to a new club in the Pioneer Square and International District area of Seattle.

18 September 1984 – The Seattle-ID club was chartered with Lloyd Hara the president.

1986 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>1986 – The California State Appeals Court reverses Judge Deutz, stating that Rotary Clubs are business establishments subject to regulation under the state’s Unruh Act, which bans discrimination based on race, gender, religion or ethnic origin. Rotary International immediately appeals the case to the California Supreme Court, who refuses to hear the case.</style=”font-size:>

 

1986 – Rotary International appeals the decision to the U. S. Supreme Court.

 

31 July 1986 – The Seattle-International District club unanimously votes to admit women.

 

4 September 1986 – The Seattle-International District  club admits 15 women.

 

15 September 1986 – the Seattle-ID club hires Margaret McKeown as counsel, files a suit and seeks an injunction against RI, and announces its admission of 15 women.

1987 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>January 1987 – </style=”font-size:> The Seattle-International District  club files an Amicus brief in the Duarte case.

 

February 1987 – California PETs includes 310 men and one woman, Sylvia Whitlock.

 

4 May 1987 – The United States Supreme Court affirmed the 1986 ruling of the Court of Appeals of California in a 7 – 0 opinion.

 

1 July 1987 – Sylvia Whitlock begins term as the first woman club president of RI and Duarte, California.

1988 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>1988 – The Rotary International Board recognized the right of Rotary clubs in Canada to admit women.</style=”font-size:>

 

June 1988 – Duarte President Sylvia Whitlock and Seattle-ID President-Elect Karilyn van Soest attend the International Convention in Philadelphia.

 

1 July 1988 – Karilyn van Soest begins term as second woman club president of RI and president of Seattle-ID club.

1989 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>January 1989 – Council on Legislation votes to change Constitution and Bylaws of Rotary to admit women. </style=”font-size:>

1 July 1989 – Council on Legislation changes take effect, and women are officially welcomed in Rotary

1995 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> 1 July 1995 – Eight women take office as District Governors. They include Mimi Altman, RC of Deerfield, IL, Dist. 6440; Gilda Chirafisi, RC of Riverdale, NY, Dist. 7230; Janet W. Holland, RC of Mineral Wells, TX, Dist 5790; Reba F. Lovrien, RC of Albuquerque Del Norte, NM, Dist. 5520; Virginia B. Nordby, RC of Ann Arbor North, MI, Dist. 6380; Donna J. Rapp, RC of Midland Morning, MI, Dist. 6310; Anne Robertson, RC of Fulton, KY, Dist. 6710; and Olive P. Scott, RC of Cobleskill, NY, Dist. 7190.</style=”font-size:>
1997 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>1 July 1997 – PDG Gilda Chirafisi, District 7230, begins second term as woman club president of the RC of Riverdale, NY, the first woman in RI to serve as president twice.</style=”font-size:>
1998 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””>January 1998 – PDG Virginia B. Nordby becomes the first woman delegate to the Council on Legislation that met in New Delhi, India. </style=”font-size:>

June 1998 – Rotary International presents its highest honor, the Rotary Award for World Understanding (RAWU), to Dr. Catherine Hamlin.

2001 <style=”font-size: 9pt”=””> 1 July 2001 – Sylvia Whitlock, District 5030, begins second term as woman club president of the Duarte club, the second woman in RI to serve as president twice.</style=”font-size:>
2005 1 July 2005, Carolyn E. Jones, PDG District 5010, Alaska, USA becomes the first woman trustee of The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International
2008 1 July 2008, Catherine Noyer-Riveau, of Paris, France, Zone 11, elected to serve as the first woman on the Rotary International board.
2009 There are 187,967 female Rotarians worldwide. Sixty-three serve as district governors.

When you look at the timeline of Rotary, you will see how many women have been active members and even presidents of a number of Rotary clubs around the world. During the times when women were known only to care for their own families, these women have broken the stigma and have come forward to do good for the mankind. Inventions such as Detoxic – a formula to fight stomach parasites and other such remedies that does not require a woman to wait hand and foot on her family when they are sick, etc, has given them the freedom to come out and contribute to the society.

POLIO SURVIVORS & ASSOCIATES (PSA)

Polio Survivors & Associates (PSA)

Portrait of Rotary Founder Paul Harris, by John Doctoroff

 

Photo of Paul Harris and John Doctoroff, from the website of the Paul and Jean Harris Home Foundation: www.paulharrishome.com

The Doctoroff painting now hangs in the Rotary Club of Chicago offices on Michigan Avenue.

 

John Doctoroff – noted Chicago portrait artist, known for his portraits of United States presidents, especially Abraham Lincoln.

To celebrate the Centenary of Rotary, the Walnut Club in Illinois decided to clean and restore a picture of Paul Harris that had hung in their meeting place for over fifty years. However, when examined by an expert, it was found not to be an oil painting on canvas as originally thought, but a paper copy coated with a special surface material and mounted on canvas, so that the picture would appear to be an oil painting. A search on the internet revealed that the original painting had been commissioned by the Chicago Number One club from John Doctoroff, and a further search showed a photo of Harris actually sitting for the artist. Rotarian Dick McKay of Burr Ridge, Illinois, has found the application of John Doctoroff to become a Rotarian in 1927. Invaluable research assistance was also given by Richard Harrison of Evanston, Illinois. Harrison knew Paul Harris as a member of the Chicago Club.

All this, though interesting, did not indicate where the picture had come from, or how it had arrived at Walnut. Since the Walnut club was not chartered until 1948 and the original painting was done in 1931 and hangs in the Chicago Club premises, where had this copy come from? Part of the answer came to light when a search in the local weekly, the Walnut Leader for the charter meeting in 1948 listed some of the gifts. These included “A large oil painting (sic) of Paul Harris & presented by the secretary of the Chicago Club “.

Further research, including correspondence with the Chicago Club, finally suggested more information. Apparently, sometime in the 1930 ‘s, the Chicago Club sold copies of the print of the Doctoroff portrait as a fund raising project. A sample copy of the order form from what appears to be 1936 has been found. The prints were sold to clubs for display at their meeting place or to be given as a gift to some Rotarian to reward ‘distinguished service’ . It is assumed that someone purchased a copy of the print which was later given to the Walnut Club at its chartering program in June of 1948. Who actually purchased the print is unknown. Did it come from the Chicago Club stores? And why Walnut located over 100 miles from Chicago? Only one other club in the 50- club district has a copy.

Trusting your money with someone will result in the same anxiety as trusting your health with someone. We tend to rely more on the reports in hand than what the doctor says out of experience. We would want the doctor to take various tests to confirm his theory. This is how much we believe technology today. When investing in stocks, many prefer to trust automated software like Fintech Limited, to human traders who make moves based solely on their instincts.

While the restored copy has only a very modest monetary value it is priceless to the Walnut Club. The print hangs today in the club’s meeting room providing a continuing reminder of the heritage of Rotary for a new century of service.
Bob Glaser Walnut RC

 

Submitted by Rotary Global History Senior Historian Basil Lewis 8 February 2006

Another portrait was done for the University of Iowa (from page 256 of “My Road to Rotary”)

“Why I am a Rotarian”

www.whyiam.org

“Why I am a Rotarian”

This free, weekly feature, originated at RGHF by PDG Dr. Eddie Blender, contains inspiring statements from Rotarians (shown below) – on why they are “Rotarians.” We hope this will encourage others to examine the reasons why they belong and see the tremendous value of each membership in creating understanding and world peace. Send us yours today.

In 2007, our two features “What Paul Harris Said” and “Why I am a Rotarian” will alternate every other week.

Why are you a Rotarian?

Send your own “Why I am a Rotarian” in 300 words or less .

Any Rotarian may submit their own essay for inclusion in our new project.

“Why I am a Rotarian” writers

(*alphabetical order) Then “talk about it” at www.rghfforum.org

Discuss Why I Am
Michael W. Abdalla
Geri A. Appel
Mian Shujja Ashraf
Kelly C. Atkinson
Wm. E. (Bill) Ballou
Edward and M. Patricia Blender
Alicia Caparros Botin
William B. Boyd
Ken Burgess
Sylvia Byers
Tony Cerato
Robert A. Cerwin
Linda Coble
Kent Converse
Michael Cooksey
Talee Crowe
Betsy Demaray
Frank J. Devlyn
Clifford L. Dochterman
Glenn E. Estess, Sr.
Dave Fihn
Bob Frakes
Herman T. Gamboa
Cathy Groves
Florence Hui
Carolyn E. Jones
Joe Kagle
Charles C. Keller
Norman F. Kloker
Peter Leslie
Jack Mayo
Rodney Mazinter
Carlo Monticelli
Susan Motter
Harvey Newcomb III
John �rtengren
R Panchanadhan
Salom�n Pesel
Carolyn W. Pierce
Marcie Schmidt
John M. Selway
John R. Sheehan
Philip Smith
Anita Stangl
Carl-Wilhelm Stenhammar
Jesse M. Tanchanco, Jr.
Cal Thomson
Cynthia Villis
Arlene Weber
Wilfred J. Wilkinson
George M. Yeiter

Geneva Rotary Club, Geneva, Illinois USA* This is a remarkable list of “Rotarians” some of whom are Doctors, Priests, or Officers of Rotary, but all are listed here by their given names, no titles. They are all “Rotarians” in spirit and in truth. Their stories, in total, will be an inspiration to Rotarians and visitors alike.

Once a Rotarian is a Rotarian for life. Being a Rotarian is not just a fact, it is an emotion and a way of life. The feeling may not always be possible to explain in words, but being proud and happy are definitely on the top of the list.

Apart from being a member of the coveted Rotary club, there is yet another way to feel happy and proud. And that is by making yourself look slimmer and lighter. Being slim has many advantages, including the fact that you appear more appealing. Obesity often comes along with many other unwanted health conditions. So the best way to battle obesity is Eco Slim.

While it is true that dieting and working out at the gym are good options to lose weight, these are seldom actually brought into execution. Eco Slim is a much easier option since is an excellent dietary option to compliment your weight loss attempts.

It is made of natural extracts from herbs that provide an amazing supply of Vitamin B complex, that includes Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, as Vitamin B2. It also contains Taurine, caffeine, as well as Succinic acid. All these ingredients combined help boost the body metabolism, help in breaking of the fat cells, preventing its recurrence. It also helps in reducing the levels of cholesterol and improves the gastrointestinal tract. It is also an excellent way to eliminate toxins from the body.

Consuming Eco Slim is also simple, as it has a palatable taste with a fruity aroma. You simply dilute the Eco Slim drops in a glass of water and drink it a little before breakfast. It helps to give a sensation of fullness that also prevents one from bingeing.

You can order Eco Slim from its official website and get some great discount offers as well.

 

 

www.actiongrouphistory.org

www.actiongrouphistory.org

Rotarian Action Groups with histories are listed below… and more will be added. To include your fellowship’s history send a message at www.historycomment.org

 

Including your history in the books is very important when the organization is recognized and growing. When there are more clubs being added every year, it is natural for people to lose track of and eventually forget a few clubs. In order to avoid such situations, a record must be kept. These records need not be exhaustive but at the same time cannot be just the list of the club names. People accessing information will need more than just the name.

This recording will let even aspiring members to know more about each clubs and decide which club they want to be a part of and which are the clubs they can try to be a part of. When they have the option, people will be more willing to participate.

Realizing the importance of this recording, the website was created, so that everyone can access all the details from anywhere in the world. What used to be in paper and files is all digitalized now and makes it easier to access. This is similar to how digitalizing trading attracted more investors to participate in the market, thus making the stock market grow much faster and increasing the IPO prices too.

Today with automated trading platforms like Millionaire Blueprint, even those who don’t know much about binary options are participating in this trade. They can do so from their seats and need not visit a trader or learn about the market. Technology has made everything easier, more accessible and simpler for one and all. Anyone can access any details and learn more without having to step out of their homes.

Instrumental in the creation of this section is RGHF Member and past Rotary International Director John Eberhard

  • PRID John Eberhard’s Plan (PDF)
  • A Bright New Century for Rotary – A Bold new Paradigm of Service

  • Observations on the RAGs Concept – Post June 2005

  • Response to Bill Boyd’s March 2006 letter on RAGs

Section Home
Disaster Relief – A Rotarian Action Group
The Rotarians for Fighting AIDS
Rotarian Action Group of Dental Volunteers
Rotarians for Hearing Regeneration
Rotarians Eliminating Malaria a Rotarian Action Group
The Rotarians For Mine Action
Rotarian Action Group for Multiple Sclerosis Awareness
Humanitarian Service
Paul Harris 711 Club
Polio Survivors & Associates (PSA)
Rotarian Action Group for Population & Development
Water and Sanitation

As of 1 July 2005, the Rotary Fellowships program belongs to a new parent entity known as Global Networking Groups. The new entity includes groups of individual Rotarians organized to focus on shared topics of interest on an international basis. Effective 1 July 2006, all existing and future fellowship groups with a service-oriented focus will be reclassified under a new category called Rotarian Action Groups, while existing and future fellowship groups focusing on fellowship of a recreational or vocational nature will remain under the designation of Rotary Fellowships. For more information, please refer to Frequently Asked Questions.

During this period of transition, both Rotary Fellowships and Rotarian Action Groups will be represented on the Rotary Fellowships pages of the RI Web site. Pending the development of a separate Rotarian Action Groups Web page, both pages will be linked through a common portal for Global Networking Groups. Please check back periodically for further updates.

Global Networking Groups currently comprise more than 90 independent Rotary Fellowships and Rotarian Action Groups. Join the growing number of Rotarians who are sharing their favorite activities and professional interests through organized recreational and vocational groups in Rotary Fellowships, or explore new opportunities for international partnership in service in Rotarian Action Groups. Whether you are interested in bird watching, motorcycling, volunteer dentistry, or the fight against AIDS, Rotary’s Global Networking Groups are fantastic resources for all Rotarians to develop new friendships and to advance opportunities for service.  (Rotary International information)

The Rotary Foundation was born as an endowment fund in 1917

To a young set of parents in Afghanistan, it was a life-saving immunization for their five-month-old son. To a woman with seven children in Malaysia, it was a loan to start a sewing business that enabled her to feed her children. To North Koreans, it was an ambulance that equipped a hospital to be able to take care of them. To thousands of college students in almost every country on earth, it was the chance to study abroad, with all expenses paid, and learn their educational specialty up close and personal.

Ask anyone who has been touched by The Rotary Foundation what it is and every answer will be different. Ask anyone who has been touched by The Rotary Foundation just how important it is, and every answer will be identical.

The Rotary Foundation was born as an endowment fund in 1917, the brainchild of RI President Arch C. Klumph. It was reborn 12 years later in the form we know today, The Rotary Foundation of Rotary international. However, it wouldn’t be until after the passing of Paul P. Harris in 1947 that TRF would reach the financial health and world importance that it enjoys today.

that their money can be used to improve the lives of others too and it need not necessarily accumulate wealth for themselves. Started by a group of businessmen who knew how to earn money and keep The reason behind this huge success of Rotary is the acceptance. People have come around to accept increasing the income, this organization flourished as more people realized the worth and started contributing. One has to become a member to start contributing through rotary and this grew Rotary international to the number of clubs it is today.

The expansion of Rotary was just like the stock market. as more companies started offeing its stocks as a tool to invest in, for the public, more traders came in and investors increased. Eventually every company wanted to sell its stocks and infuse funds to help the business grow. Today, investing in the stock market is not as complicated as it was before. Just like how Rotary’s way and means of carrying out projects have changed and evolved, the stock market has too.

If one does not know much about the stock market, they can take the help of automated softwares like HBSwiss, and invest wisely. This software calculates and moves your money into the right funds, based on your needs and preferences, thus removing the need for you to not only operate in the stock market, but also know much about it. As technology improves, the businesses evolve along with it.TRF was one such organization that evolved over time and changed to be what iti s today.

Technically speaking, it is a not-for-profit corporation that supports the efforts of Rotary International to achieve world understanding and peace through international humanitarian, educational, and cultural exchange programs. It is supported solely by voluntary contributions from Rotarians and friends of the Foundation who share its vision of a better world.

 Its expenses are born solely by the interest earned on its contributions over a three year period.

As an endowment fund for Rotary “to do good in the world,” its initial contribution was US $26.50 in 1918. When it became The Rotary Foundation in 1928, it had a value of US $5,739.07. In the most recent year that we have complete figures, the Foundation had more than US $73 million contributed in 2000-01. But, that’s not what The Rotary Foundation is all about. Its event-filled 85 years has been a story of Rotarians learning the value of service to humanity, and the citizens of the earth benefiting from that service.

The Humanitarian Programs of the foundation help fuel international Rotary projects to improve the quality of life, providing health care, clean water, food, education, and other essential needs primarily in the developing world.

A major Humanitarian Program is PolioPlus, which seeks to eradicate the polio virus worldwide by Rotary’s 100th birthday in 2005. Through its Educational Programs, the Foundation provides funding for some 1,200 students to study abroad each year. Grants are also awarded to university teachers to teach in developing countries and for exchanges of business and professional people. Even its former participants in the Foundation’s programs can continue their affiliation with Rotary as Foundation Alumni.

Welcome to the History of The Rotary Foundation.

Doug Rudman

History Fellows Chair

Rotary Global History (2002-2004)

 

Coordinator: PDG Helen B. Reisler

Webmaster: DGN Don Murphy

RGHF’s list of Missing Fellowship Histories

RGHF’s list of Missing Fellowship Histories
No longer active

IFRFR has been changed to International Fellowship of Wellness and Fitness of Rotarians.

 

The Fellowship of Fitness Rotarians was initially formed in the mid-1980s by first international chairman Don Fraser of the St. Helena Rotary club in California, President of the American Running & Fitness Association.

After three years the fellowship disbanded but was then reorganized 5 years later after approval by 30 District Governor’s from different parts of the world with initial membership from 14 different districts by Rotarian Harold Friend, MD, (International Chair for 8 of the years between 1992 and 2006 & District Governor 1998-9) under the new name of International Fellowship of Running and Fitness Rotarians.  This occurred just before the 1992 Orlando Rotary convention and the first of many �fun runs� occurred each day at that convention starting in front of the convention hall each morning.  Also, in that year PRIP Cliff Dochterman held a �Salute to the Fellowships� in Cambridge, MA.  During that meeting over 30 Rotarians assembled to run in the snow each morning creating friendships that lasted for years.

Since then the fellowship has steadily grown with members coming from 38 different countries.  The largest numbers are from the United States, Japan and India.  Over the years IFRFR sponsored over 300 road races from 3 km up to full 42K marathons, the largest of which was in 2005 at the Rotary convention. In addition, IFRFR organized fun runs each morning at 15 of the Rotary conventions from 1992-2006. The most beautiful of which was running along the Mediterranean Sea in the early morning during the Nice France convention in 1995.

 

Fellowship Members at the 2004 Osaka Convention

These were closely followed by morning runs along a river in Calgary 1996 and, at the Glasgow Scotland convention in 1997, running at the break of dawn in a beautiful park near the convention site. During the years there were a number of wonderful projects that individual members organized. Under the direction of Rajan Vir (Vice-Chair 1997-2000) an exercise area was built in a park in Pune, India.  Peter Gray (1998-9 Chair) organized a group of Rotarians to run the London Marathon with a talk by Sir Roger Banister.  Jean-Emile Vanderheyden (Vice-Chair 1996-8) organized a 20 Km run for Parkinson�s Disease in Charleroi, Belgium.

Toshi Ihara (1999-2000 Chair & Vice-Chair for 9 years) helped organize the Mt. Misen international walk that has now been held for over 10 years walking up that sacred mountain in Japan. In 2006 our first woman Chair, Suzan Rada, returned the leadership to the St. Helen�s club in California.

Fitness – the word that has every head turning today was never given much importance earlier. There were very few people who paid attention to their fitness. This is because, earlier people used to be physically more active than what people are today. One had to walk or cycle his way to meet a neighbor or to get some items at the store.

But today, technology has improved to such an extent that people who stay within the same house use their mobile phones and online Applications to communicate with one another. With such increased use of technology, one has become physically less active. A sedentary lifestyle is what you can see today. As a result, people end up spending a good part of their monthly paycheck on gyms and fitness classes, to ensure they are fit and healthy.

A fellowship for those who are keen on their fitness and are ready to try new routines to improve their fitness quotient is nothing short of fun. The members are seen to be relaxed and open to new ideas and techniques. Here you can see businessmen competing with one another in physical exercises rather than the share price of their company’s stocks. This is a competition with a different perspective.

No matter how frequently one uses Goji Cream, to get rid of their wrinkles or keep their skin young, when they are physically fit and healthy, it shows on their skin. The skin is healthy, supple and young looking for a long time. People who are physically active tend to look younger than their age.

One can invest in stocks and precious metals, from any part of the world

 

 

www.ourfoundation.info

“Our Foundation Newsletter” was created 1 March 2001 by RGHF (Rotary Global History) Founding Member, Past Rotary Foundation Coordinator, and RGHF director emeritus PDG Dr. Eddie Blender and is now edited by Past RGHF chair Calum Thomson, Scotland.

It is not just newsletters, but many rules and regulations get changed over time too. This is done to suit the current needs and also to ensure the concept evolves over time and is in tandem with the current scenario.

If you take investments for that matter, what used to be a small scale operation has now blown over and is a full pledged international operation. One can invest in stocks and precious metals, from any part of the world. And with technology improving, the trading has all gone online for one and all to use, right from the comforts of their own homes. They need not travel to a common place where the stocks are bought and sold, need not shout and get what they want. People can pick up binary options and other stock options, with the touch of a button today. To top it all, we have the automated softwares like HBSwiss, where one need not do much and the App will take care of it all. All the analyses is done by the computer and the investment moves are done for you based on these analyses and calculations. Being developed by an experienced trader, this software takes into account everything a trader would, before making an investment.

However, if you are planning to invest in the stock market by buying some binary options for yourself, here are few of the terms to know about:

Binary options, also known as exotic options are available to invest in and sell within a fixed time period as they have an expiry date. The most common among these options are the high low option, also known as the fixed return option. The expiry time is also called a strike price and this is the price that determines the outcome of a trader’s investment.

If the trader’s judgment is correct and when the option expires, if his quote is on the right side of the option, he is paid in full. The instrument may have moved only a little but if it had gone up as anticipated by the trader, even if it does not match the amount quoted by the trader, he gains.

On the other hand, if the instrument had moved in the other direction, even if only a little, the trader loses it all. Hence the risk is high and the returns are also equally high. Trading in binary options will require one to have a sound knowledge about the market; else they can take help from the various softwares available in the market.

When the market it expected to rise, the trader purchases a call option and when the market is expected to go down, the trader will purchase a put option. When the option expires, the movement of the option is analyzed to see if it has indeed gone up or down. And then the trader is settled, based on his call or put option.

When the binary option is outside the US, it is mostly the current price that is taken as the strike price. When these options are offered, all details are disclosed to the traders. The details include the payout, strike price, expiry, and risks involved. These details are crucial for a trader to decide on his call or put option.

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“Our Foundation Newsletter”from Rotary Global History

2005

Jan. 1

Feb. 1

Feb. 15

Mar. 1

Apr. 15

May. 15

Jun. 1

Jun. 15

Jul. 1

Aug. 1

Sep. 1

Sep. 15

Oct. 1

Oct. 15

Nov. 1

Nov. 15

Dec. 1

2006

Jan. 1

Jan. 15

Feb. 1

Feb. 15

Mar. 1

Apr. 1

Apr. 15

May 1

May 10

Jun. 1

Jul. 1

Aug. 1

Sep. 1

Oct. 1

Nov. 1

Dec. 1

2007

Jan. 1

Jan. 15

Feb. 1

Mar. 1

Apr. 1

Apr. 15

May. 1

Jun. 1

Jun. 15

Jul. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 15

Sep. 1

Oct. 1

Nov. 1

Nov. 15

Dec. 2

2008

Jan. 1

Feb. 1

Feb. 15

Mar. 1

Mar. 15

Apr. 1

Apr. 15

May 15

Jun. 1

Jun. 30

Jul. 1

Aug. 1

Sep. 1

Oct. 1

Nov. 1

Nov. 15

Dec. 1

2009

Jan. 1

Jan. 11

Feb. 15

Mar. 1

Apr. 1

2010

2011

(See our prior year archives)

Also see: Rotary Centers Major Gifts Initiative – Also in Chinese

There is also a Chinese language section for all of Dr. Blender’s work

Our four RGHF features “What Paul Harris Said,” “Frank Talk Gems,” “Our Foundation Newsletter,” and “Why I am a Rotarian,” are emailed once each month. Get your free copy www.historycomment.org 

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