Clifford L. Dochterman

President’s Name Clifford L. Dochterman
Presidential Year 1992-1993
Theme Real Happiness is Helping
Biography CLICK HERE
Home Town (Moraga, California, USA)
Convention Host/

Convention History

Melbourne, Vic., Australia
May 23-26 (22,083)
Other Information
  • The ABC’s of Rotary
    • Examples
  • Recognized by Rotary Global History with the 1905 Liberty V Nickel
  • 12 Steps to the Centennial
  • What is a “PHF” Paul Harris Fellow?, by CLD
  • There is a famous phrase which goes ‘united we stand, divided we fall’ and there is great truth in it. It essentially means that when individuals with common ideas join together they can work as a team and all of them will be undefeated.This could also be the aptest way to describe an organization like Rotary International.

     

    The world comprises of millions of people and they face a range of problems in almost every sphere of life. Rotary has been in existence for more than hundred years and it has been involved in causes that are faced by people globally.

     

    Rotary believes in the tremendous power and potential of collective strength. They unite people from all walks of life to connect with each other. These collaborations form the basis to exchange ideas and information. This helps them to come up with the best solutions for change that is sustainable.

     

    Right from its first President, Paul Harris, to its current leadership, Rotary has been able to fulfill its various objectives under their able guidance. One of the ablest Presidents of Rotary was Clifford L. Dochterman. He was the President from 1992 to 1993 and was instrumental in continuing the vision of his predecessors.

     

    One of the common traits that all Rotarians share is ahard working spirit. We believe that hard work can make it possible to achieve the impossible targets and no problem is too big to handle. Each Rotarian believes in perseverance and this is the reason we have been able to strive through some of the toughest situations.

     

    Rotary members work throughout the world to solve the most complicated and challenging problems. We continue to do so without any fear of risk and many consider this an admirable quality.

     

    When individuals have such a strong drive to work hard and succeed it could lead to a situation where health is neglected. Our lives today are very demanding and stressful. A common problem faced by several people is maintaining a perfect balance of work and health such that none of these two aspects suffer.

     

    Lifestyle diseases such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease, etc. are becoming a common occurrence at an alarming rate. The main reasons for such diseases are alcohol, smoking or drug abuse as well as unhealthy eating habits and absence of physical activity.

     

    Sometimes even maintaining healthy eating habits cannot guarantee that the ideal weight will be maintained. A product like Chocolate Slim works wonders to reduce weight and does not require having to undergo any crash diet.

     

    It is a diet supplement for those with healthy eating habits and a lifestyle of moderate activity. It tastes delicious, as it is chocolate flavored and is a combination of the best ingredients for weight loss.

     

    It is made up of natural ingredients only and without any parabens or chemicals. The dosage one would consume would depend on the weight one wants to lose.

     

    This drink not only suppresses hunger but also leaves you feeling satiated. This is a great way to avoid any cravings for unhealthy food and sweets. Most importantly, it regulated the metabolic processes, lack of which results in weight gain.

     

    This revolutionary product is suited for both men and women and the perfect tool for your weight loss journey.

“We live in the present, we dream of the future, but we learn from the past.”

“We live in the present, we dream of the future, but we learn from the past.”

In Rotary, there are a number of members contributing at different levels. No matter how much they contribute, everyone makes a difference to someone’s life. This organization as a whole has contributed a lot to the betterment of human lives in many areas.

As the clubs grow, they cross milestones just like how the introduction of the automated software – Infinity App is a milestone in binary options trading. Rotary projects are a milestone in the development of th society.

Guest Editorial

(From the February, 1949 issue of The Rotarian)

Here’s One Man’s Collection of Pivotal Events in the Development of the movement. What is yours?

 

By Ralph S. Dunne�

Chairman, Districting Committee of Rotary International

 

When Madame Chiang Kai-shek� spoke at Madison Square Garden in New York City a few years ago, she significantly said, “We live in the present, we dream of the future, but we learn from the past.” What a lesson that holds for Rotarians! “What is past is prologue to the future” ‑ yet how many of us know the dramatic incidents which have provided milestones in the development of Rotary?

There are many Rotarians today who are deeply concerned about the future. They feel that we are in the midst of another crisis when we must soon decide whether we shall again emphasize the importance of individual action, or see Rotary largely expressed through corporate action. They insist that Rotary as an organization must “do something.”

How many know, for example, that Rotary faced a great crisis in 1913 and again in 1923? Had very wise decisions not been made, possibilities for future usefulness and growth might very well have been destroyed. And how many know the interesting story back of the selection of the name “Rotary International”?

 

Let us, then, glance back and from the lessons of the past be fortified and guided in making the decisions today which many believe are necessary if Rotary is to go forward to greater influence.

1911‑The Rotarian Is Born. Early in 1911 Paul P. Harris wrote an essay on “Rotarianism” which he thought might well be distributed to the handful of Rotarians in the United States. Secretary Chesley R. Perry had the bright idea of publishing it in a periodical which might or might not continue. Before long The National Rotarian, Vol. 1, No. 1, journeyed forth with Paul Harris’ message, together with news of Club activities, personal items, and editorials.

 

The underlying significance of the inauspicious event in 1911 is that a device was created which

recognized the importance of the individual Rotarian, irrespective of Club, District, national, or geographic lines, for the official magazine goes from the center of the organization directly to the individual Rotarian. We can today say of our magazine what someone said of Shakespeare: it “needs not praise but comprehension only.”

 

1913‑The First Crisis. For several years after Rotary was founded by Paul Harris, February 23, 1905, great emphasis was placed on advancing the business interests of Rotarians by sharing business with each other. Some Clubs actually designated a Rotarian to act as statistician, who kept a record of business each member received from others.

 

At the 1913 Convention in Buffalo, New York, President Glenn C. Mead made very clear what some Rotarians had been thinking and saying ‑ viz., that Rotary could not survive if this selfish approach continued. He declared that service rather than material gain should be the cardinal principle of Rotary. And his views were strongly supported by Frank L. Mulholland, Russell F. Greiner, and Allen D. Albert, all of whom later became Presidents.

 

As a result of this forceful emphasis, the concept of “the importance of the individual” took on a new meaning in Rotary.

1915‑A Financial Problem Solved. Rotary was almost bankrupt in 1915: Frank Mulholland, then President, realizing the seriousness and urgency of the situation, conceived the simple idea of asking Rotarians each to contribute a dollar. This commonsense method of raising a sizable amount of money proved quite successful; Rotary has not been financially embarrassed since that time.

1921 ‑ A New Name. In June, 1921, President Crawford C. McCullough headed a group of Rotarians who had an audience with King George V at Buckingham Palace. Among those present were Guy Gundaker, Glenn Mead, Frank Mulholland, Arch C. Klumph, Rufus F. Chapin, and Arthur Chadwick. After Rotary ideals had been explained to King George he is reported to have said, “I want to see Rotary International spread to every corner of the British Empire.”

 

In 1921, when a Committee of Thirty‑One met in Chicago to rewrite the Constitution and Bylaws of Rotary, someone must have recalled that interview with King George. “Why not,” he asked, “change our name from the International Association of Rotary Clubs to Rotary International?” The idea caught on and “Rotary International” was written into the Constitution adopted at the 1922 Convention in Los Angeles. In the light of what has transpired since, many believe that the movement was given impetus and vision by this action.

 

1923‑Another Crisis Met. It was not long after Rotary was founded that Paul Harris expressed the hope that Rotary Clubs would embark on a program of civic activities and community betterment. Boys work in aiding crippled children so captured the imagination that many had come to believe it to be the whole work of Rotary.

The Convention at St. Louis in 1923 debated the question, then adopted the now‑famous Resolution 34, which clarified our thinking by stipulating that:

No Club should allow any Community Service activities to obscure the Objects of Rotary or jeopardize the primary purpose for which a Rotary Club is organized. … Activities which enlist the individual efforts of all Rotarians generally are more in accord with the genius of Rotary than those only requiring the mass action of the Club, because the Community Service activities of a Rotary Club should be regarded only as a laboratory experiment designed to train members of a Rotary Club in service.

Again the importance of the individual Rotarian can be seen influencing the course for the future of Rotary.

1927‑The A. & 0. Committee. While the Aims and Objects Plan was adopted by Rotary International at the Ostend, Belgium, Convention in 1927, its history goes back several years to one Sunday morning. Sydney W. Pascall, then President of Rotary International in Great Britain and Ireland, and Vivian Carter were walking through a woods in Surrey, England, and the discussion turned to Rotary education. Sydney deplored the Rotary ignorance of the average Rotarian, and outlined a plan to make the Rotary Educational Committee more effective.

 

These two men later exchanged letters which led finally to the putting down on a half sheet of paper what became known later as the Aims and Objects Plan. The scheme was tried out for 12 months in the Rotary Clubs of Britain and Ireland and more than half the Clubs adopted it. Later Vivian came to Chicago and, using a blackboard, explained the plan to the Board, which submitted it to the Ostend Convention.

 

It is interesting to note that the original A. & 0. Plan contemplated only three lines of activity: Club Service, Community Service and Boys Work, and Vocational Service. In 1928, at Minneapolis, International Service was added.

 

At Nice, France, in 1937 the Bylaws were again amended to do away with the separate Committees for the Services. Now one member of the Aims and Objects Committee is responsible for each of the four.

 

1933‑Revista Rotaria. The first of what may be several non‑English editions of THE ROTARIAN, very appropriately named REVISTA ROTARIA, was published in Spanish. Since then it has gained steadily in reader interest and has been a major factor in the growth of Rotary in Ibero‑America.

 

1949‑Where Tomorrow?

There are many Rotarians today who are deeply concerned about the future. They feel that we are in the midst of another crisis when we must soon decide whether we shall again emphasize the importance of individual action, or see Rotary largely expressed through corporate action. They insist that Rotary as an organization must “do something.”

 

Those who make these demands fail to realize that Rotary’s position and influence in the world will never be more than the reflection of the individual Rotarian. The individual’s application of Rotary’s ideals is, it seems to me, more important than corporate activities at the Club or top level.

 

We don’t have to sponsor something to make Rotary a living force. We can individually make it so. There is truth in the statement that “Through the power of the individual a new age will stir and be formed. No new age has been formed in any other way.”

 

The great opportunity facing the more than 320,000 Rotarians today is to expand the area of decency and understanding in all the relationships of life among all the peoples of the world. This is enough to command our best thinking and acting.

 

What we do as individuals in giving life and meaning to Rotary is the only worthy measuring rod by which we should want the world to judge us.

 

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF MOTORCYCLING ROTARIANS

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF MOTORCYCLING ROTARIANS

The International Fellowship of Motorcycling Rotarians was founded in 1992 by Rotarians in Australia, Canada, Sweden, and the United States, and now has members and chapters Worldwide. The Fellowship is open to all Rotarians with an interest in motorcycles… touring, riding off-road, racing, collecting, restoring, motor scooters or otherwise. You don’t have to own a motorcycle to join.

Have you ever rid the motorcycle or been on one for a long journey. If yes, you will understand how exhilarating and fun it can be. There are many people who despite having all the fancy cars and planes prefer to go on their bikes, simply to enjoy.

These motorcycle enthusiasts have various groups and clubs in various areas, where they meet up and plan on some trip. The motorcyclists will not know each other in the beginning of the trip, but by the end of it, they will have a friendship that is sure to last for life.

These bonds are formed out of discussions over their bikes, their trips, journeys, which eventually spill over to their personal lives, because motorcycles have nothing professional or official about them. It is a personal interest and not everyone do something about such an interest.

It is not easy for the motorcyclists to do what they do. It is indeed a lot of money that goes into buying these bikes, maintaining them and tweaking them to make it unique. Many people will have to fight their families to keep this interest alive. Some people face health issues too, due to holding those handle bars for long or sitting on the bike for long journeys. Though joint pains are a major concern, varicose veins is also a possibility. It is not just for the aged, but even young riders can be affected. Many of these joint pains and varicose problems can be solved with Varikosette and help these bike lovers carry on their journeys.

Have you ever rid the motorcycle or been on one for a long journey. If yes, you will understand how exhilarating and fun it can be. There are many people who despite having all the fancy cars and planes prefer to go on their bikes, simply to enjoy.

These motorcycle enthusiasts have various groups and clubs in various areas, where they meet up and plan on some trip. The motorcyclists will not know each other in the beginning of the trip, but by the end of it, they will have a friendship that is sure to last for life.

These bonds are formed out of discussions over their bikes, their trips, journeys, which eventually spill over to their personal lives, because motorcycles have nothing professional or official about them. It is a personal interest and not everyone do something about such an interest.

It is not easy for the motorcyclists to do what they do. It is indeed a lot of money that goes into buying these bikes, maintaining them and tweaking them to make it unique. Many people will have to fight their families to keep this interest alive. Some people face health issues too, due to holding those handle bars for long or sitting on the bike for long journeys. Though joint pains are a major concern, varicose veins is also a possibility. It is not just for the aged, but even young riders can be affected. Many of these joint pains and varicose problems can be solved with Varikosette and help these bike lovers carry on their journeys.

The Motorcycling Fellowship is focused on having fun and fellowship, on meeting other Rotarians from around the World and on motorcycle safety. We fully support all of the tenets of Rotary, and although we have raised money for charity, we tend to fulfill our community service through our local Rotary Clubs. Local rides may be for a day, a weekend or longer, with routes generally planned so Rotarians can ride the complete route or join us along the way. Most of the Fellowship’s events are open to all Rotarians, their families and guests and all marquees ridden by Rotarians are welcome.

The North American Chapter has held events in New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, Texas, Washington, the Great Lakes area, Arizona, New Mexico, and in California, plus we have had rides to Mexico and Canada.

On an international level, six members of the United Kingdom Chapter spent four weeks riding across the United States from New Jersey to Los Angeles in the 1994 Trans-USA-Ride and in 1996 the Fellowship organized three international rides…the Ride-Round-Britain (Wales, England, Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland), the Ride-to-Calgary to the International Convention and the European Alpine Tour.

In 1997 the Australian Chapter organized the Simpson Desert Ride with Rotarians from Holland, the United Kingdom and Australia participating, seven Scandinavian Rotarians rode the southwest United States with Rotarians from Arizona and southern California, Rotarians from the United States rode with the United Kingdom Chapter after the Glasgow International Convention, four Rotarians from Australia rode with the North American Chapter in the San Luis Obispo Ride in California, and Rotarians from the United Kingdom rode with French Motorcycling Rotarians.

During 1998 new Chapters were formed in Belgium, Holland and in New Zealand with the Northern Europe and United Kingdom Chapters joining in the Belgium and Holland Chapters’ rides. With active chapters in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Central Europe, France, Holland, New Zealand, North America, Northern Europe, the United Kingdom and elsewhere, a full schedule of rides is planned.

The Year 2000 Oz Ride is planned for the last week in February through the first two weeks of March of year 2000 for southeast Australia and Tasmania. With fourteen members of the United Kingdom Chapter already committed to this ride, the Australian Chapter is organizing the details and we are expecting Motorcycling Rotarians from all parts of the World to participate in the Year 2000 Oz Ride.

Antique, Classic & Historic Auto World Fellowship

Antique, Classic & Historic Auto World Fellowship
The Fellowship was founded about 17 years (1988) ago by Brian Henry of the Rotary Club of Wagga Wagga in Australia under the name of “Rotary Retro Automobile Fellowship” (RRAF).

After successfully prospecting for members throughout the world and getting good response in New Zealand and the United States, Brian Henry met Roger Guinet of the Rotary Club of Cap d’Agde, France at the International Rotary Convention a few years later.

Roger was instrumental in gaining footing for the fellowship in Europe. About 10 years ago he set up the RRAF in Europe as the local coordinating body of the international fellowship.

The RRAF Europe was active for nearly a decade in France, the UK, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium and Germany.

Outside of Europe membership was to be found in Australia, USA and New Zealand.

Because of health problems of the two initial leaders (Henry and Guinet) and the rising popularity and number of classic car clubs outside of the Rotary sphere of influence, the original enthusiasm for the RRAF gradually diminished in a number of countries.

Speaking of good health, did you know your body breeds parasites over time, that slowly eat away at your immune system and weaken you?

And how would you react if you were told that this horrifying problem has a simple solution. Drink some herbal tea. That’s right. You get tea infusions like Fitobalt that are aimed specifically at eliminating the parasites from your body. It is even called an anti parasitic tea.

All you have to do is boil the powder in water, let it infuse and cool for half an hour and then consume it, ideally in the morning, before lunch. Over a period of 21 days, if you consume it every day that is, your body would have slowly but surely flushed out the parasites.

It’s important to eliminate these parasites as with time, they weaken the body making it more prone to allergies, headaches, fatigue, sleep disorders, muscle and joint pains, etc. In other words, you will become weak.

In addition to flushing out the parasites, the tea also has inflammatory properties. It boosts metabolism, flushes out toxins in the liver and over time reduces the impact of allergic reactions. With a better metabolism, you will feel more energetic and active and over time this will reflect not only on your body but your skin, hair and nails as well.

Flushing out toxins will help you feel lighter and that will help fight common ailments. It will relieve you from fatigue, frequent headaches, lethargy and make you feel rejuvenated.

Coming back to RRAF organizations,

By the year 2000 many of local RRAF organizations had ceased most of their activities except in the UK, Ireland, Switzerland and the Netherlands

In 2001 Brian Henry, notwithstanding his health handicap, started an initiative for revival of the fellowship.

At that point in time the name of the fellowship was changed, in consultation with Rotary International, in order to reflect its area of interest in a better way.

The name became: Antique, Classic & Historic Automobile Fellowship of Rotarians.

Unfortunately, in 2003, Brian’s health problems reappeared.

In order to continue his task of reviving the fellowship he asked Maurice Elzas, chairman of RRAF Netherlands, to take over the international chairmanship after consulting with Rotary International.

The new chairman and his team embarked in this venture with great enthusiasm and got rewarded by serious expression of interest from almost everywhere on the globe.

To celebrate this revival and commemorate the first rally ever held (in 1894) an appropriate event was organized In France in 2004 in which 25 teams of 4 countries participated. (See: Past Events on this website)

A General Assembly was held at this occasion (See minutes on the Organization page) and the structure and name changed into the present one: Antique, Classic & Historic Automobile world Fellowship of Rotarians.

International Computer Users Fellowship of Rotary

International Computer Users Fellowship of Rotary

ICUFR

A Group of Rotarians formed a forum on Prodigy. They all “signed on” ever so often so a listing of the members may be available.  This group discussed many aspects of Rotary and just had a great fellowship.
After some time, they decided to meet in person since sending photos by email was a long drawn out process. Connection times were 8,000 K tops.

This was the speed of internet those days and not everyone had access to the internet. Many had to go to centers that offered internet access for a fee. This is how technological connectivity began. We at Rotary used it to the maximum limit possible and started communicating electronically. But the speed was just not enough. The amount of time every member had to spend in front of their computers to see few pictures or read an Email was just too much to ask for.

The old school of meeting in person and talking face to face will never go out of style. No matter how fast the internet connectivity is and how easy it is to communicate via Emails, sometimes meeting in person is what helps.

They formed a Group; of Rotarians on Prodigy – ROPr with Skip Turner as the leader. About the same time, the ICUFR was failing and Skip asked if they wanted to take it over to breathe some life into it. Someone had contacted him about the ROPr group and asked if they were interested. A few ROPrs were hesitant suspecting that our fellowship would be adversely effected by a formal organized effort. They really had a fun and lively group. Soon,  another element arose. Prodigy raised fees and started charging for time and messages. Many of them dropped Prodigy. Skip Dave and others worked hard to get CompuServe to give them their own forum. Initially they used ProComm’s forum until they had enough members to form their own CompuServe Forum. CIS was more sophisticated and they had to adapt, use certain software, and become more ‘puter savvy. I remember when Granny switched over, she was worried about developing her skills to communicate. But, she was sending people to their rooms in a very short time. The first ROPR/ICUFR meeting was in Skokie, IL at the “Suites on the Interstate. Ken Scheffel arranged for the rooms and then missed the meeting because of travel emergencies.  The meeting format was established at this meeting. They toured the Rotary HQ and then had computer oriented meetings on Saturday and a banquet with speakers Saturday night. Friday night was a fellowship night and Al “Seleck” Dixon kept things light. her skills to communicate. But, she was sending people to their rooms in a very short time. The first ROPR/ICUFR meeting was in Skokie, IL at the “Suites on the Interstate. I arranged for the rooms and then missed the meeting because of travel emergencies – I was still employed then. The meeting format was established at this meeting. We toured the Rotary HQ and then had computer oriented meetings on Saturday and a banquet with speakers Saturday night. Friday night was a fellowship night and Al “Seleck” Dixon kept things light.

Also in Denver in 1926 and 1966

Also in Denver in 1926 and 1966
 Armando de Arruda Pereira, Sao Paulo, Brazil

 

ARMANDO AND TOM — When, at midnight on June 30, 1941 Rotary leadership fell upon new shoulders throughout the world, Rotary’s highest office, the international Presidency, passed between these Rotarians�from Armando de Arruda Pereira, of S�o Paulo, Brazil, to Attorney Tom J. Davis, of Butte, Montana. A year ago, in his inaugural address and guest editorial, President Pereira called for “More Clubs . . . More Friends!” Rotarians responded, despite world upheaval, with 137 new Clubs, 56 of them in his own hemisphere, and quickly came to regard this smiling engineer as their symbol of growing inter-American understanding. This photograph was taken during the International Assembly at Colorado Springs, Colorado, in the week preceding Rotary’s 1941 Convention at Denver.

Picture and caption were found on page 6 of the July 1941 issue of the Rotarian.

Doug Rudman

Wolfgang Ziegler

Jean and Paul Harris presented at the Denver Convention Rotary Sundial dedicated on 14,000 foot peak.Rotary memorial on top of Mt. Evans (a 14,000 foot peak) placed there by the Rotarians of District 113 (Now D5450) in l941 in honor of the Rotary International convention that was hosted by Denver Rotary in June of that year.
 

RI Archives

 

Pereira Bio

Wolfgang Ziegler

It was to be dedicated by the then RI President Armando de Arruda Pereira of Sao Paulo, Brazil in June of that year.  Because of the weather it could not be dedicated until August. The succeeding RI President Tom J. Davis of Butte, Montana was able to return to Colorado for the dedication. Courtesy of PDG Norris Hermsmeyer D5450 and PDG Eddie Blender D5470
The “Objects of Rotary”

on Mt. Evans

The Re-dedication…

The 1941 Convention in Denver was held between June 15th and 20th with a registration of 8,956. Of these, 8,738 were American – the rest traveling from the relative safety of Mexico, Canada or Cuba.

The  number of clubs fell in this unhappy period from 5,066 in 1940 to 5,058 in 1941. Japan’s 44 clubs became non-existent and  the figures would have been much worse if not for the rapid acceleration of clubs in South America, perhaps inspired by Brazilian President of RI Pereira.

Again, the dilemma of a world where some Rotarians were at war and others not dominated events. President Pereira made clear that he believed that Rotary Clubs “in a country not at war cannot be used for war purposes. Rotary Clubs in a country at war will do their part to serve their country, but in doing so should not attempt to use their friendship with Rotary Clubs in other countries not at war to promote war purposes in such countries”.

Sadly, this dilemma did not concern countries such as the USA by the end of the year.

Every year Rotary has conventions for presidents of that year. The presidents get a chace to meet all the other fellow presidents of the same year and also discuss various projects in line. with a cup of Chocolate Slim in hand, these presidents discuss everything ranging from world politics to poverty and come up with ideas to help the poor.

Both Paul and Jean Harris attended the Convention where Paul both reminisced and looked to the future: “If an impracticable League of Nations was the offspring of the World War, perhaps a practicable League of Nations will be the child of the present war“. Rotary would, indeed, played its part in setting up such a practicable League of Nations – the United Nations.

Harris ended by quoting: “Watchman, what of the night?”“The morning Cometh”

He ended hoping -“Let the morning come soon”.

RIBI’s Tom Warren spoke to the Convention via a link from London and the gathering told him at the end of his emotional speech that they were with him.

The new President, Tom J Davis proclaimed that “Rotary was born in time of peace, but its program of service is even more necessary in a period of world conflict”.

M. A. T. Caparas

President’s Name M. A. T. Caparas
Presidential Year 1986-1987
Theme Rotary Brings Hope
Home Town (Manila, Philippines)
Convention Host/

Convention History

Munich, Germany
June 7-10 (26,909)

The quest to look good is something that people all over the world are aiming for. It is not something that is restricted to the female population alone. Men, all around the world, are more conscious about their appearance than ever before. Whether is trying out the latest beauty products or the latest information in cosmetic technology, men and women are equally keen to know.

 

Among the various products to look young, the most popular are anti aging creams. These creams are skin care products that are created for consumers who want to look young by hiding, preventing or reducing signs of skin aging. Wrinkles are one of the most visible signs of skin aging, which take place due to the various natural biological processes of the body.

 

Wrinkles appear on the surface of the skin as we age. The elasticity of our skin reduces and wrinkles appear. Another reason is the activities of the facial muscles on a daily basis.

 

There are several choices when it comes to methods and treatments to take care of wrinkles. The choice one makes would be dependent on the desired result and the price one is willing to pay for it. An important factor to remember is that not all these methods are effective equally and some might not be effective at all.

 

One of the most popular choices to get rid of the wrinkles is plastic surgery. Though it is an effective method, it is expensive and hence unaffordable for many. One advantage is that it works fast and the results are visible almost immediately.

 

For those who find plastic surgery expensive, products like Goji Cream are an ideal solution. This anti aging cream is effective and a far less invasive option. Though it might take some time to show the results, it is an extremely affordable option. Goji berries are the main ingredients used in this product. These have strong anti oxidant properties and are rich in amino acids.

 

This cream works by keeping the skin deeply hydrated and thus gradually smoothing the wrinkles. It also works by activating the collagen that is present in the skin. Collagen helps the skin to regain its elasticity and makes skin look young and fresh.

 

While cosmetic beauty is important to increase confidence, maintaining your health is also important for your well-being. It enables you to be more productive and perform your daily functions well with consistency.

 

Having a disease free life is possible by making the right lifestyle choices. One must also remember that not everyone is fortunate to get the opportunities to do so. There are millions around the world who cannot access even the basic health care facilities.

 

This is one of the many causes taken up by Rotary International. They have been working to make sure that each individual realizes that good health is a right.

Each of the Rotary Presidents had a theme and one of the most notable themes was that of M.A.T. Caparas. He served as the President from 1986 to 1987 and the theme of Rotary Brings Hope is an apt description for the organization.

From initiatives and projects at the community and global level, Rotary is working hard to make the dream of good health care a reality.

ROTARIAN ACTION GROUP FOR BLINDNESS PREVENTION

ROTARIAN ACTION GROUP FOR BLINDNESS PREVENTION

Our mission is to bring together, in fellowship and service, those Rotarians who have an active interest in the prevention of blindness and the promotion of eye health and vision worldwide.

To provide both a platform and a forum to discuss ideas and develop appropriate cooperative programs to further our shared goals.

To promote international understanding and peace through our common purpose and efforts.

Blindness is one of those conditions one can never understand fully unless experienced. One can claim to understand the world of a blind person by blindfolding themselves for an hour or so. But that is not how the life of a blind person.

If you were to blindfold yourself and life the life of a blind person for a few hours, you can  only not see the things you are used to seeing. You will still be able to understand when someone tells you “watch out, there is a table to your right”. This is because you have seen a table and know what it is and what a high table or a low table is. For a blind person, table is just another object they have set eyes on. A table and a chair has different purpose to them too, but it is just a piece of furniture, if not warned about, will get in their way and hurt them.

You would still know what the color yellow is and what red is. You would not be able to see them only those few minutes you are blindfolded. You may experience the difficulty in moving around but you will never be able to experience learning about things only by touch and never getting to know what it looks like.

This is how difficult the life of a blind person is. When such a disease can be avoided, Rotary wanted to step in and do what it could, to reduce the number of blind people in the world. It wanted to give people sight and enable them to see everything around them and have a holistic experience.

Many are born blind, many lose sight as time goes by. Though all cannot be saved, many situations could have been different, if people had received the right treatment at the right time. Eye transplants are possible today and there are many people who have realized their eyes have no use once they are dead and have signed up for eye donations.

When an eye is available, ot needs to be transported and fixed for another person within a stipulated time. This requires a lot of resources and investment. Rotary came together, collected funds and started handling this problem. As a result, many were given the gift of sight. Some were able to see again while many saw for the first time.

Many companies and organizations are coming up with products and services that can be used by blind people too. Even if a blind person wants to trade, he need not analyze charts or “watch” the market constantly. He can invest the money and let Millionaire Blueprint take care of the rest. He can use the computer or get someone to read out the results to him as and when he wants to check on his investment. There is no need to keep an eye on the investment at all times. Such technological developments ensure everyone can benefit from the market movement, irrespective of their problems and short comings.

This Action Group is an outgrowth of the former Avoidable Blindness Task Force, the Fellowship of Eye Care Professionals, and the Eye Care Fellowship of Rotarians.  All Rotarians interested in preventing blindness and improving eye health are invited to become members of this official Rotary Action Group.

This Rotarian Action Group operates in accordance with Rotary International policy, but is not an agency of, or controlled by Rotary International.

Fellowship of Rotarian Magicians

Fellowship of Rotarian Magicians
Back in 1991 Jim Toth was asked by RI, along with PDG Howard Killough to reactivate the Fellowship of Rotarian Magicians.  This was successful and this fellowship is now into our 10th year of publishing its newsletter.  Jim Toth has served as the President and newsletter editor ever since activation.

Water and Sanitation

Water and Sanitation
Every drop counts
Water sanitation is a big problem everywhere. A little contamination is enough to affect a whole neighborhood. And it affects the health in a big way. What is the use in drinking a cup of Fitobalt every day, when the water used in it is contaminated? Hence Rotary has decided to focus on this issue and provide safe drinking water for all.

History of the Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group (WASRAG)

In the Rotary year 2003-04 the then President of Rotary International asked Rotary clubs and districts to emphasize water and sanitation in their programs. Initially he created the Water Resource Group whose function was to provide information and support to clubs wishing to embark on “watsan” projects. It soon became apparent however that clubs needed more. They needed access to the most appropriate technologies, to outside funding and to expertise, none of which were available within the traditional Rotary structure.

Most important, it became apparent to Rotarians and to potential funding partners that the original Rotary model – many small projects with limited community involvement or empowerment – would not have the impact many Rotarians were seeking. Nor could the supply-driven focus of many clubs achieve any significant degree of sustainability.

Thus was born the Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group (WASRAG)−Rotarians working to improve life and livelihood through the provision of safe water and sanitation. WASRAG�s mandate is:

“To provide information, support and encouragement to Rotarians, Rotary Clubs and districts to take active roles in projects/programs to develop safe water and sanitation as a means of promoting health and alleviating hunger.”

To fulfill this mandate WASRAG�s goals are to:

  • Create awareness among Rotarians of the importance of conservation and sustainability and of local and global water issues;
  • Raise awareness of the need for, and benefits of, safe water and sanitation;
  • Develop a compendium of best practices to ensure sustainability and cost-effectiveness;
  • Distribute information on appropriate technologies for supplying, conserving and purifying water and for sanitation;
  • Build and encourage mutually beneficial relationships with other organizations, corporations, agencies and NGOs sharing common water and sanitation related goals;
  • Identify alternative sources of financing to complement The Rotary Foundation e.g. private foundations, corporations, government agencies;
  • Assist in identifying and formulating programs and projects that will promote sustainability;
  • Implement mechanisms to determine the effectiveness of projects;
  • Create a network of experts accessible to Rotarians and Rotary clubs;
  • Provide training and education on water/sanitation technologies and issues;
  • Facilitate the exchange of information via a web-based forum a forum;
  • Establish a bibliography of relevant materials, references etc.;
  • Give information on relevant conferences;
  • Act as advocates on water issues;
  • Support Rotary clubs seeking financial and/or technical assistance;
  • Foster “Centers of Excellence” on water/sanitation;
  • Operate a web-site and produce regular newsletters or bulletins;
  • Implement procedures to ensure sustainability and cost-effectiveness;

WASRAG was authorized by Rotary International to carry out this mission in February 2007 and was officially launched on World Water Day, March 22nd, 2007 at the National Press Club, New York. Since then it has facilitated some 200 projects−helping clubs find partners, helping to ensure sustainability, stressing the importance of a needs-driven approach, developing best practices, encouraging a holistic, integrated approach in which water is not the end in itself but is rather the means to a better life and livelihood in the community. Most importantly it links water and sanitation to personal hygiene, better health, empowering the community – especially women, irrigation and agriculture, education and literacy and, ultimately, child mortality.